Starting at Home: Anchoring Innovation


Tuesday, November 7: 4:00pm – 5:30pm

This follow-up to April's Starting at Home Conference discusses the role that anchor institutions play in community development in Ohio and nationally. Panelists will cover how colleges, hospitals and other entities can be partners in revitalizing urban neighborhoods.


Moderator:

Bryan Grady, Ohio Housing Finance Agency
Dr. Bryan Grady is a Research Analyst at OHFA and received a Ph.D. in planning and public policy from Rutgers University earlier this year. At OHFA, he is responsible for development of the annual Ohio Housing Needs Assessment, as well as program evaluation, grant management, internal consulting, reporting, and special projects, such as the Economic Impact of the Ohio Housing Trust Fund report published by OHFA. Dr. Grady previously co-authored a study, Methodology for Determining the Economic Development Impacts of Transit Investments, that received funding from the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, and has a publication pending with the Journal of Planning Literature. He also received a fellowship from the Lincoln Institute for Land Policy to support his dissertation research, which investigated the role of regional jurisdictional fragmentation in a variety of public policy outcomes, including housing affordability. Dr. Grady has been employed at OHFA since 2013, previously served as a researcher at the Ohio Bureau of Labor Market Information, and also holds degrees in economics from the University of Delaware and the University of North Carolina.


Speakers:

Daniel Skinner, Ohio University
Daniel Skinner, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Health Policy in the Department of Social Medicine at Ohio University's Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, in Dublin, Ohio, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University (at Nationwide Children's Hospital), and Assistant Director of the Health Policy Fellowship, a certificate program of the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. His areas of expertise include health care politics and policy; the politics of medicine and disease; hospital-community relations; and health care for vulnerable and underserved populations. At present, he is working on two books currently under contract with university presses. The first, The Politics of Medical Necessity, explores the political dynamics and power relations at work in determining what is (and is not) considered medically necessary in American health care. The second, entitled Medical Urbanism and co-authored with sociologist colleagues from Ohio University (Berkeley Franz) and The University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Jonathan Wynn), is a three-city study of how hospitals change the urban environments in which they are located. Dr. Skinner is also Associate Editor for the Americas for the journal Critical Public Health, Program Director for Ohio University's Cuba Comparative Health Systems Program, and a scholar-activist with interests that include the promotion of universal health care access. Skinner's research has appeared in journals including Health Communication, The Journal of Health Care Management; The Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice; Public Administration Review; The Review of Politics; Polity; New Political Science; The Journal of Medical Humanities, The Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, and The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, among others.

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, The Ohio State University
Dr. Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (PhD, The New School; MBA, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, University of Michigan) specializes in creative economic development, cultural policy, arts entrepreneurship, and nonprofit management. She examines the ways that cities use arts and culture in planning, fostering livable communities and creating economic development strategies to build their brand, attract residents and tourists, and distinguish themselves from other urban centers worldwide. Her book, Planning for a City of Culture: Toronto and New York (Routledge, Taylor & Francis, March 2017) brings a new, fresh perspective to the study of creative cities by using policy theory as an underlying construct to understand the role of arts and culture in the transformation of Toronto and the revitalization of New York during the decade of the 2000s. Goldberg-Miller has published in Cities: The International Journal of Policy and Planning; Artivate: A Journal of Entrepreneurship and the Arts and Journal of Enterprising Culture, and has co-authored a chapter in Creating Cultural Capital. Dr. Goldberg-Miller is Assistant Professor of Arts Administration, Education and Policy, and Affiliate Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning in the Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University, and serves as Academic Advisor to the City of Toronto's Department of Economic Development and Culture. Prior to joining the OSU faculty in Autumn 2014, she taught at The New School, Hunter College, and Columbia University. An experienced fundraiser, Goldberg-Miller was on the executive team at The Paley Center for Media, American Cancer Society, Greenwich House Pottery, March of Dimes, American Museum of Natural History, and Museum of Holography. As a management consultant, seminar leader and speaker, Dr. Goldberg-Miller serves clients including The Greater Columbus Arts Council, Columbus' Lincoln Theatre, Parsons School of Design, Aspen Institute, National Geographic, and Sesame Workshop, as well as numerous individuals and community-based organizations.

Beth Robinson, Uptown Consortium, Inc.
Beth Robinson is President & CEO of the Uptown Consortium, Inc. (UCI). UCI plays a pivotal role in advancing the development and direction of the city's fastest growing employment core. Through her aggressive agenda, Beth has leveraged the anchor institution's assets and ecosystem to invest over $250 million in Uptown real estate and economic development projects. Today, the Uptown area has transformed into a thriving, multi-dimensional urban district that features world class innovations in health care and education and five diverse, vibrant neighborhoods. During her tenure, local media have called the changes in Uptown, a "renaissance," and in 2014, UCI received an Excellence in Economic Development Award from the International Economic Development Council. To UCI, Beth brings more than 25 years of experience in community and economic development. Throughout her career, she has led economic and real estate developments and business retention projects in various roles across the region, including roles with the University of Cincinnati, the City of Cincinnati, the City of Covington, Kentucky and the City of Springdale, Ohio. Beth is a Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) and received both her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Cincinnati. She is an active member on multiple boards, including the Hamilton County Development Company, and she is a graduate from the Leadership Cincinnati program in Class 36.

Angela Mingo, Nationwide Children's Hospital
Angela Mingo serves as the Director of Community Relations for Nationwide Children's Hospital. She is responsible for developing and managing strategic partnerships with external organizations. Angela directs the community engagement efforts of the hospital and works closely with neighborhood and civic organizations. She has been instrumental in the implementation of the Healthy Neighborhoods, Healthy Families initiative, a five prong approach to neighborhood revitalization efforts on the city's Southside, led by Nationwide Children's Hospital. Angela served as Community Affairs Director with Columbus City Council from 2000-2007. There, she worked with community leaders and local elected officials to support the clean indoor air ordinance and citywide affordable housing initiatives. Angela currently serves on the United Way of Central Ohio Home Impact Council. She is a former mayoral appointed commissioner with the City of Columbus Community Relations Commission and served on the commission's executive board. Angela serves as a gubernatorial appointment to the Ohio Lottery Commission. She serves on the boards of the Greater Ohio Policy Center, Parsons Avenue Redevelopment Corporation, NeXT Basketball Foundation, Leadership Columbus, Stowe Mission of Central Ohio, and Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing. She is a member of the Fifth Third Community Advisory Forum and the Columbus Office of Minority Health Advisory Committee. Angela is a graduate of the Leadership Columbus 2012 Class and participant in the Big Brother, Big Sisters mentoring program. Angela earned Bachelor's Degrees in Portuguese and International Relations as well as her Master's of City and Regional Planning Degree from The Ohio State University. Angela's honors include Columbus Business First Health Care Heroes Award, Greater Columbus Community Helping Hands Community Relations Ambassador Award, and recognition in Who's Who in Black Columbus. A native of Canton, Ohio, Angela is married to Clarence E. Mingo and is the proud mother of two lovely daughters.